Guide to connecting an ADSL router to the telephone network

This article explains how to set up an ADSL router. ADSL stands for Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line and an ADSL router is always connected to the telephone network. The telephone network is sometimes referred to as the PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network),

Basic Setup

The first part of this article shows you how to connect an ADSL router if you are also going to be using the telephone network.

Equipment Used:

  • ADSL Router
  • A LAN cable
  • PSTN cable #1 (red/green/beige PSTN cable) – this will connect to the wall socket
  • PSTN cable #2 (white/black/grey PSTN cable) – this will connect to the ADSL router
  • PC / Network device (ie. desktop, laptop, tablet, etc.). PC will be more useful for testing.
  • Router Power Adapter
  • Splitter
  • POTS filter
  • PSTN Phone (can be used for testing line phone line)
Image of an ADSL router and telephone lines using a splitter connecting to the telephone network

Isolated Setup

The “Isolation Test” is a method to narrow down what the issue is when you have an ADSL Fault / Connection Issue.  This cuts out the filter / splitter, phone line and PSTN phone to get to the root of the connection issue.

Equipment:

  • ADSL Router
  • LAN Cable
  • PSTN cable #1 (red/green/beige PSTN cable) – this will connect to the wall socket
  • PC / Network device (ie. desktop, laptop, tablet, etc.). PC will be more useful for testing.
  • Router Power Adapter

The diagram below indicates with black dots what equiupment should be removed from your ADSL connection.

ADSL-Setup-Basic2

Troubleshooting to test the PSTN line for a dial tone

  • Unplug all devices from every phone socket, including your modem, telephones and fax machines.
  • Plug a standard phone handset (without a splitter/filter) into the phone socket, and then make a call, listening for line noise.
  • If you were able to make a call without line noise, skip ahead to the “*”.
  • If you have more than one phone socket in your home, plug your phone handset (without a splitter/filter) into each of those sockets and make a call, listening for line noise. If you hear line noise when your phone is plugged into one socket but not another, there may be a problem with your home’s internal wiring.
  • Using a different phone handset, repeat steps 2 and 3. If you hear line noise on the original phone handset but not a different handset, then the original handset may be faulty.
  • If you still keep on hearing noise on the line then the line might have a fault and can be reported here. Note down the reference number so that the client can follow it up as Telkom will be working with them direct to arrange a callout.
  • *If you don’t hear line noise any more, plug your phone handset into the phone socket with a splitter/filter and make another call, listening for line noise. If you hear line noise again, that filter may be faulty.
  • Plug your other devices back in (one at a time) and attempt to make a call without hearing line noise after each new device is plugged in. Always start with any devices that require a splitter/filter (Router/Modem, Fax, etc.).
  • If you suddenly start hearing line noise again, then the device you’ve just plugged in may be faulty or interfering with your phone service, or it may be plugged in with a faulty splitter/filter.
  • Recommend replacing a filter or device if it is faulty, or adding a filter to a telephony device if it didn’t already have one.

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Category: ADSL

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